Friday, February 27, 2009

Even triathletes must have standards



I received an email today about an Ironman 70.3 in Kansas for only $225. The first thought that came to mind was why anyone would want to pay $225 to do a swim, bike, and run all in the same day in Kansas and how I can get in on that racket. Granted, parts of KC are cool, but there are lots of places the lemming would go before Kansas.

But triathletes are a different bunch, and thinking like a triathlete, if I was faced with the decision of going to Kansas to do a triathlon or competing against JTT in the Escape from Alcatraz, I'd pick swimming with the sharks and the humiliation from JTT when my bike handling skills failed to compensate for my lack of fitness without a second thought.

Being easily amused has its perks though. I started looking around the site, amusing myself that "Over 1,800 athletes including 50 Professionals will compete for 50 Ironman World Championship 70.3 slots at Ironman 70.3 Kansas." It dawned on me that the 50 slots given away were probably the key motivators for the race. Like wolves thinning out the herd, people going for the little 70.3 big time might assume that Kansas is their best shot out of them all, at least I would. Problem is so does everyone else.



Just when I was about to close out of the site, I found this little gem in the FAQ:


FAQ Symbol Can I use a recumbent bike?
  • NO

Not only are recumbents not allowed, the word NO is capitalized as to shout NO! when answering. It appears that even triathletes have standards and for all of their goofiness, even they can't "handle" recumbents. Mountain bikes with slicks are ok, but no relaxed seated bikes, who is the next victim of this discrimination? I have no solid reason as to why this is enforced, perhaps no place to mount aero bars?



It's unfortunate really, there could be hours of drunken entertainment on the odd sports channel if more recumbents were allowed in large events. Just think of recumbent downhill mountain bike racing and the chaos that would ensue. Imagine the time trial in the Tour of California and the comments from Craig Hummer about the enclosed plastic fairing. The large packs and spectacular crashes in crits would be way more entertaining when a bunch of recumbents mix it up.

8 comments:

Nick said...

BL: A recumbent would be considered resting as per Tri standards. There is NO sitting / resting before during or after a tri event.

A recumbent is better suited for a hot dog eating contest.

frilly said...

Hey, maybe you, Nick, and me can go in as a relay team.

Nick said...

A relay race? Oh I am in. I do rellay well in races that I am not required to race the entire time.

I.P. said...

You know I did a triathlon once. It sucked. It was about a quarter of the way through the swim that I realized that I can't actually swim. And I really hate running (I realized this as soon as I dismounted my bike and started running). Yet I am always hearing of people (usually middle aged women) who are doing a triathlon. And I'd really like to cheer them on, but I just can't. Because really, triathlon's suck (almost as much as recumbent bikes do).

BikeLemming said...

I.P. My thoughts exactly... I want to cheer them on, I just can't... why do that to yourself? I don't see the draw...

frilly said...

All right Lemming. We were gonna take it easy and let you have the bike leg. Forget about it. You're in the drink now!

Anonymous said...

Dear Nick and I.P.,

Apparently, you've never been victim to a brutal back injury that makes recumbent bikes the only entre you could ever have into competing in a triathalon. Congratulations on being superior.

Recumbent bike said...

A nice idea to race using a Recumbent bike. in a team very interesting activity. really we get lot of enjoyment and its a best fitness workout equipment.